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Very thought provoking. For me the hub is your statement "killing any insect regardless of the crimes they've committed against humanity." and is killing a wasp because it bothers you as acceptable as having to kill for example Asian Long Horned Beetle because it is not native and kills trees - of course it isn't. But leaving it up to self regulation clearly doesn't work - is this because of the widely recognised void the majority of humans have with nature?

As a soils person the use of any fungicide, pesticide or herbicide has consequences often beyond our knowledge and as such the handling of such products in the complacent manner we see nowadays is the biggest problem we have.

Pesticides have the main role to keep our plants and vegetables from harmful insects. Some people don't want to use this because they want organic.

"...the widely recognised void the majority of humans have with nature" sums the situation up nicely - and it's one the pesticide division of agribusiness exploits effectively, aided virtually unchallenged by the gardening media.

Going back to the storm in a media teacup around Monty Don standing his ground, when the BBC are prepared to lay out in detail the potential knock-on effects of using synthetic pesticides (whether it's the implications of the energy and resources required for their manufacture right through to their after-use effects on living ecosystems) then only then do we get close to being able to say that the viewer can make an 'informed choice'.

The problem with squishing lily beetles is it doesn't have any knock-on effects for the natural world, and involves no financial outlay on over-hyped pesticides sold in pretty containers and marketed using love hearts (i.e. it doesn't make money for anyone).

Gardeners are key players in rolling back the pesticide tide that's currently engulfing our gardening media - by simply finding ways toward better balanced gardening and leaving those pretty containers to fade on the garden centre shelf.

Finding out about gardening that's in balance with nature is a powerful first step toward filling the 'void'.

Thanks for the comments.

Pip

"is killing a wasp because it bothers you as acceptable as having to kill for example Asian Long Horned Beetle because it is not native and kills trees - of course it isn't. But leaving it up to self regulation clearly doesn't work - is this because of the widely recognised void the majority of humans have with nature?"

It is a tough call. There's something inside me that says it's wrong for me to decide the fate of another species just because that species is killing my food or wood supplies.

But you are right, self-regulation doesn't work (not even humans can manage it properly).

John

you've kind of skipped answering the question.

I asked the question purely from the moral perspective. Surely every living creature is sacred and therefore killing one just because it is damaging my vegetable crop cannot be justified?

You've flipped my question into a political point.

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